British Film Institute

Tu Mera Sunday LFF Review

Milind Dhaimade’s Tu Hai Mera Sunday is a charming little surprise of a movie. This story of five amiable friends in Mumbai trying to navigate a little football time for themselves isn’t really attempting to re-invent the wheel – and this allows the film to relax long enough to breathe some life into the characters that inhabit it, such as the rather mysterious figure of the old man suffering from dementia (Shiv Subramaniam, perfect) who becomes the catalyst for most of the events that drive the narrative.

None of these people are strangers to those familiar with the classic Hindi film “Bombay milieu” – there’s Jayesh (Jay Upadhyay, funny), the well-to-do Gujarati who wants to get away from his noisy, religious family that bores him well-nigh to madness; “Bawa” (Nakul Bhalla, affecting), the Parsi who is surrounded by the slowly crumbling ruins of his cultural past as he tries to comprehend his present; Domi (Vishal Malhotra, competent as ever), the Catholic mummy’s boy who could have been a musical success; Arjun (Barun Sobti, charming), the upper class, clean cut, “hero” type whom everybody loves but acknowledges is a slacker. However, this is a movie whose camera chooses to linger just that extra moment to capture the fly in one’s favorite sweetshop, so the last friend is Rashid (Avinash Tiwary, stellar), who wonders whether any of the girls who’re happy to go home with him at the end of a date would be equally happy to accept a proposal of marriage from a Muslim.

Tu Hai Mera Sunday is a movie that carries its liberality lightly and therefore feels more relatable and true in a way that the holier-than-thou lectures unleashed by hypocritical mainstream Bollywood stars are not. When one of the friends argues that the girl he likes is “not like the girls” Rashid takes home with him, he very matter-of-factly points out that there is nothing wrong with the girls he dates either. At another point, a man confesses that he chickened out of confessing his feelings because he wasn’t sure if he could provide the girl he loves with all the luxuries she wants out of life – only to have her retort that she is well able to get those material luxuries for herself and is simply looking for someone who cares for her (Shahana Goswami, total package as always). In fact, for a movie that’s all about five boys in need of a playground, this is a movie that embraces its women – from the happily married upper class woman obsessed with the perfection of her child to the middle class deserted wife striving to raise her deaf boys to the best of her ability to the woman navigating an inter-religious relationship.

Billed as a movie about creating space for oneself in the great urban sprawl that is Mumbai, Tu Hai Mera Sunday is equally a movie about living one’s life in a city where it is easier to live a routine. Dhaimade is a talent to watch.

Tu Hai Mera Sunday (You Are My Sunday) had it’s World Premiere at the  60th BFI London Film Festival, as part of the festival’s Love Gala on 15th- -16th October.

Review by Amrita Rajan. You can find more of her work on her blog or follow her on twitter!

London Indian Film Festival (16 – 23 July 2015)

Rama (Suraj Sharma) & Lalu (Tony Revolori) UrmikaThe Bagri Foundation London Indian Film Festival kicks off with Sundance winner Umrika with hard-hitting cricket documentary Death of a Gentleman to close the festival.

Prashant Nair’s Umrika, winner of the Audience Award at the 2015 Sundance Film Festival, starring Suraj Sharma (Life of Pi) and Tony Revolori (The Grand Budapest Hotel), will be the opening night gala of The Bagri Foundation London Indian Film Festival (July 16-23). The festival is now in its 6th edition and firmly established as Europe’s largest showcase for South Asian cinema. Nair’s debut film Delhi in a Day was a great success at the festival’s 2012 edition. Prashant Nair, writer/director of Umrika, said:

“I’m so excited to hear that Umrika will open the London Indian Film Festival this year. We’ve heard such great things about the audiences at LIFF and can’t wait to share our film with them. We’re hoping the film’s nostalgic portrayal of 1980s India, its themes and the many cross-cultural references will resonate with LIFF’s audiences.”

The festival is pleased to announce that the Bagri Foundation, a charity whose aims include the advancement of literacy, education and the arts, with an emphasis on those of India, and the appreciation and understanding of Asian cultures, is on board as the Title Sponsor. Alka Bagri of the Bagri Foundation said:

“Cinema has a vital role to play in exploring lives, sharing emotions, investigating social issues, and expanding horizons. Given the explanatory power of this medium, we are absolutely delighted to be supporting the London Indian Film Festival as title sponsors. The Bagri Foundation is committed to promoting rich cultural endeavours, fostering dialogues and providing platforms for creativity to blossom. In line with this, the Bagri Foundation London Indian Film Festival offers a fantastic opportunity for art lovers to embark on an exciting journey and to immerse themselves in South Asian culture.”

This year, the dynamic festival is also expanding to UK’s second largest city Birmingham with a selection of highlight screenings at Midlands Arts Centre and Cineworld Broad Street.

Sachin fans at Chennai 110320 Photo by Philip BrownThe festival will close with hard-hitting cricket documentary Death of a Gentleman, featuring Ravi Shastri, Kevin Pietersen, Lalit Modi, N Srinivasan and Giles Clarke. Director Sam Collins said:

“Death of a Gentleman has been four years in the making, and we are hugely excited to be chosen as the closing film at the 2015 LIFF. This is a very human story about passion, money and power, and we hope to make a persuasive case to cricket fans and non cricket fans alike that the greatest game in the world needs to change its ways.”

Other programme highlights include: a rare Screen Talk by one of India’s most acclaimed mainstream filmmakers Tamilian giant Mani Ratnam, Berlinale winner Dhanak, Venice winner Court, Toronto doc. Monsoon and also Bengali art-house hit Labour of Love. UK premieres continue with Slumdog-like The Crows Egg and 31st October starring Soha Ali Khan. Nepalese Bollywood actress Manisha Koirala attends to support a charity event for the Nepal Earthquake Appeal. Actress Konkona Sen Sharma will present her films Saari Raat and Gour Hari Dastaan: The Freedom File, with the latter’s director Ananth Mahadevan also in attendance.

The festival includes the coveted Satyajit Ray Short Film Competition & Award, supported by the Bagri Foundation.

Major Partner Sun Mark Ltd returns with its Pure Heaven brand. Other returning partners include Grange Hotels, British Film Institute, Asian Single Solution and Technicolor. Cinema venues include Cineworld Cinemas, BFI Southbank, Institute of Contemporary Arts (ICA), Picturehouse Central and Midlands Arts Centre.

The full programme will be announced 18th June.

LIFF’s Executive & Programming Director Cary Rajinder Sawhney said:

“It is wonderful that the festival is expanding so rapidly in stature and reach, proving there is an un-tapped market for Indian independent cinema with UK audiences.”

For more information on the festival please visit:

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Hindi with English subtitles | 98 min | India 2015 | Dir. Prashant Nair | with: Suraj Sharma, Tony Revolori, Adil Hussain, Smita Tambe, Prateik Babbar.
This year’s Sundance Audience Award winner is an uplifting, rights of passage tale about two brothers from a small village who have dreams of making it big in Umrika (America). Udai (Pratiek Babbar) is the eldest and adored by his hard-working mum. He leaves their hamlet on a bullock cart to pursue his dream after he says he has received an invitation to work in the US.

Torn between pride and grief his mum waves him off. Months go by but there is no word from Udai, family pride turns to concern. Younger son Rama (Suraj Sharma, Life of Pi), shares the family’s increasing grief and then suddenly letters start to arrive. His parents cheer up again as amazing pictures of the USA fill their lives. All seems well until Rama discovers that the kindly local postman has forged the letters. Rama runs away from home to discover his brother’s true fate.
Q&A with Dir. Prashant Nair and other special guests.

English | 90 min | Australia, UK | Dir. Sam Collins | with: Kevin Pietersen, Ravi Shastri, N. Srinivasan, Lalit Modi, Giles Clarke.

A hard-hitting documentary of interest to cricket and non-cricket fans alike. Cricketing journalists Jarrod Kimber and Sam Collins set off on a journey to report on the current state of health of Test cricket and to investigate the impact of 20:20 cricket on the five-day game. They end up in something more sinister than they could ever have imagined. During their thrilling three-year journey they criss-cross the globe from London to Australia, from India to Dubai and back again, during which they meet players, the game’s administrators, fans and controversial cricket financiers, resulting in a film that is about much more than cricket. This is a film about passion, about money, about power and it’s a film about standing up for what you care about before it is too late.

Q&A with Dir. Sam Collins and other special guests.
The Bagri Foundation supports documentary films as a powerful medium to raise social awareness.

R.I.P.D, Marvel’s Agents Of Shield and Captain America: The Winter Soldier Upodcast

The boys are back in town.  And they’re not in a good mood.  Although Martin hasn’t watched TV in about 3 weeks Asim and Ahmed have been tucking into Agents of Shield and that hasn’t gone down very well.  Are hints of the A-Team and guest spots from Nick Fury and Agent Maria Hill enough to keep us tuned-in each week?  Martin is in the midst of some kind quest to find the holy grail of gothic and horror cinema, courtesy of the British Film Institute. 8 movies in 8 days and a mere 17 to go in the next 3 weeks.

So surely there has to be something out there to keep us enthusiastic.  We talk about the new trailer for Captain America: Winter Soldier and what we expect from the coming movie.  Plenty of action (natch) but we could well be seeing the beginnings of one of the less understood and appreciated super heroes being shaped into someone truly 21st century.  And for that we are happy!

Moving on to the week’s feature, RIPD, where to start?  Quite possibly this movie won’t operate at a loss when it’s finished its journey around world cineplexes…but maybe not.  And it wouldn’t be a surprise to know that either.  Can Kevin Bacon act any differently in this than the mobile phone ads he’s in in the UK?  Can Jeff Bridges produce an accent different to True Grit?  Will Ryan Reynolds still be acting in big budget movies in 2 years time?  Tune in for this and more!


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EP 83 Empire State Review, Bat-Fleck and a dissapointing summer of movies- Upodcast

If the Chinese celebrated more than just animals in their yearly zodiac, then 2013 wouldn’t be the year of the snake, it would be the year of The Rock.  Our latest podcast talks about one of Dwayne Johnson’s many movies this year, Empire State.  Also featuring the lesser-spotted Hemsworth (Liam) and a largely irrelevant Emma Roberts, Dito Montiel’s early ’80s throw back about a real life heist in New York is our featured film.  The box-cover promises much, but will it take its place in the pantheon of classic heist movies, such as Riffifi, Heat, Inside Man, or even The Bank Job?  We’ll be the judge of that, thank you very much!

Here is the trailer of Empire State:

Ahmed brings a sad note to proceedings with news of Burn Notice’s farewell season. A great show and clearly the 21st century Magyver. That said, all good things must come to an end…but where will we go now for our fix of funnies, Bruce Campbell and impromptu lessons in how break locks and make bombs from kitchen supplies?

As the summer draws to a close, we start by reflecting on a somewhat lacklustre season of box office smashes. A few have delivered: Man of Steel & Iron Man 3, but instinctively we’re left underwhelmed, despite evidence that Hollywood is in fact up on last summer with its blockbusters AND the notable flops – The Lone Ranger and RIPD. New markets – Asia most notably – have helped score big time, but for how long can the studios get away with releasing the same movie twice? That means you Olympus has Fallen and Whitehouse Down.

No wonder then that Martin has been spending a lot of time at the British Film Institute in recent weeks, this time catching up on the restored silent Hitchcocks.  The Lodger, Blackmail, The Ring etc. – all from the earliest part of his career, in the 1920s.  However, of much more importance, was that Asim talked about the Twitter and Blog shredding news of Ben Affleck’s casting as Batman in the upcoming Superman films.  Batfleck or whatever you want to call him seems to be a uniquely Marmite choice in that you love it or hate it.  Ahmed then introduces us to Graceland – a new US TV show about undercover cops and FBI agents living in the confiscated house of a convicted Elvis-fanatic drug lord.  How does that not sound good?

More cerebral matters are up next with a chat about Keanu Reeves’ excellent doc. Side by Side, which charts the technological evolution of movies from 35mm film, through to today’s multi-platform, lack of common standards digital era.  That ought to be the high point…but Upod is also happy to bring you Mermaids.  Not the Cher/Danny de Vito/Winona Ryder effort from the early ’90s, but a documentary that seeks to prove their very existence.

Author rolls on floor laughing.

You can download/listen/ stream our latest Upodcast Episode below:

Dial M for Murder 3D – a review in 2 dimensions


The perfect murder?

Dial M for Murder 3D. During what has become my unofficial Hitchcockathon at the British Film Institute this month, I had the chance to watch a restored version of Alfred Hitchcock’s 1950s classic in 3D. Possibly a surprise given my aversion to this technique/technology but with such a legendary film-making figure using it way back when, it proved too tempting to resist. Let’s start with the basics (spoiler alert) of plot: ex-tennis player Tony Wendice (Ray Milland) plots to have his adulterous wife, Margot Wendice (Grace Kelly) killed by blackmailing an old friend from university days, C.A. Swann (Anthony Dawson). The scheme is elaborate and has taken months of planning and preparation. Confident his wife will be killed and that “the perfect murder” will have been committed, Tony’s dastardly plan is foiled when Margot kills the intruder, setting off a chain of events that lead ultimately to his capture.

Hitch wasn’t a huge fan of this film, making it because he was under contract and because another project had fallen through. Whether this influenced his use of 3D or not, I can’t say, but it is used sparingly and sensibly. I was certainly more aware of a lower camera angle to take in things like tables and lamps in the foreground, with the actors further away. And of course there are memorable scenes such as that where Grace Kelly reaches behind her to grasp the scissors. But that aside, we’re not “treated” to particularly staged shots as such and the movie feels very natural. It could well be that in choosing to keep the action 95% in the apartment (it was an adaptation of English playwright Frederick Knott’s successful play) Hitchcock’s hand was forced in minimal use of 3D. From his interviews with Francois Truffaut, we know that he chose not to open-up the film with needless outside shots of people approaching the apartment, or being taken in a police car to the courtroom. In fact there isn’t even a court room for that particular sequence.

With news that ticket sales for 3D films have been declining – presumably in part due to less content – I wanted to re-examine the subject and Dial M was the perfect opportunity. So, where does this leave us with a new but old take on 3D? Well, when it’s used like this, I cannot complain. It is when things start to feel contrived that I have problems and the sense of gimmickry overrides the natural flow or appearance of the film. And post-conversion is of a course a no-no in my book, serving nobody’s best interest. So, what are the motivations for audiences in watching 3D movies and more importantly, what are the motivations for film-makers wanting to use 3D? I remain convinced that viewers do not necessarily expect 3D in all movies and moreover, that entire movies need not be shot this way. If it was good enough for Hitch to use it in only 1 film and even then in very few set-pieces, then I think that speaks volumes. What is also clear, is that sales of 3D televisions are relatively poor. Even those that have sold, have not all been bought purely with 3D in mind – the purchase cycle of simply buying a new and Smart TV will take some credit here. Perhaps consumers just aren’t ready to sit at home and wear glasses for occasions where they are habitually used to not doing so.

This leaves moviemakers and what they want to gain by using 3D. Quite clearly we have the ultimate exemplar in James Cameron’s Avatar and some stunning scenes in Ang Lee’s Oscar

I love you darling & would never have an affair with this chap behind me

winning Life of Pi. However I would argue that one is a good film and one isn’t. In the case of Avatar, we have a (perhaps justifiably) hyped Fern Gully where the effects come thick and fast, but tellingly, is not a good experience in 2D. With Life of Pi, we have a more measured use of the effect and a darned strong film that will still work in 2D due to its superior story. 3D alone will not a good movie make; there simply needs to be substance over style. If Christopher Nolan – who knows a thing or two about making good movies that also make a metric f*ck ton of money – won’t work in digital, let alone 3D, how far can we expect the landscape to change? Martin Scorsese has of course released Hugo and has repeatedly said he is interested in the medium, but appears to have gone no further with it. For a technology that has been around for decades, surely we would have seen literally thousands more features employing three dimensions? We haven’t and what we have had has been generated in fits and starts – a few years where 3D is employed more heavily and then fallow periods where it’s back to usual.

I’ll theorise that when studios have conducted market research over the years and have perhaps asked “what do you want to see more of in movies?” cinema-goers haven’t replied in their droves “oooh, definitely more movies in 3D please”. So why this push over the last few years? I’ll refer to a recent interview with James Cameron where he talked about making 3D movies where you don’t need to wear glasses (which would be a great start) but also in which he talked about his own company pushing that technology into theatres. I think this is perhaps the biggest clue of all: money and James Cameron’s belligerence in using technology from which he stands to make even more of it. There’s just no pleasing some people is there? Don’t forget that the third dimension costs more (of our!) money and is also no guarantee of a great film. I personally don’t want to ban movies in 3D, but at least give me the choice please. And whilst I won’t be betting against James Cameron, I’ll wager we have a good many years ahead of us before he gets his wish.

Getting back to the film that started this verbal meander, I’d like to recommend everyone to watch it – 3D or not. Grace Kelly is as beautiful as she ever was, the story is clever and Hitchcock gives us genuine will he-won’t he? moments, stringing the audience along right to the very end. Measured use of 3D adds a little bit of something to an already great film and if you’re in France, this will be the first time those old enough to watch the original get to see it as the director intended. For some reason, the French theatres at the time couldn’t be bothered to install the necessary equipment spend the necessary money. Perhaps there’s a lesson in that, from the nation that gave birth to cinema.


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Top Ten Movies of Upodcast – An Alternative to the Sight and Sound Poll

Last week there The British Film Institute released it’s Sight And Sound Poll, a survey they do every decade with over 800 Film critics, distributors and academics. The big news this year was that Citizen Kane was knocked out the number one position by Vertigo.

There hasn’t been much change in the names and the most recent film on the poll is 1968’s 2001: A Space Odyssey, so our friend and previous Upodcast guest Adam Lowes (Check out his appearance on our Podcast by clicking here) conducted an alternative Film Bloggers Top Ten over at HeyUGuys and asked us to put in our two cinematic cents, which we were more than eager to do.

As always our choices are vastly different but pretty much in line with the guys you know so well yapping about movies on Upodcast.

Of course these aren’t definitive lists,they aren’t in any order of preference and I should add a disclaimer that these aren’t the best movies but maybe our favorite movies but does that really matter?

They are vastly different from the Sight and Sound Poll and some of our picks did make it in the HeyUGuys list.

We also asked our good friend FilmiGirl to send us her list as she is pretty much part of the Upodcast Family.

Here we go!

Asim‘s List:

  • Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind
  • Godfather Part 2
  • Sholay
  • Goodfellas
  • 12 Angry Men
  • Pulp Fiction
  • Inception
  • There Will Be Blood
  • Once Upon a Time in the West
  • Andaz Apna Apna

Martin‘s List:

  • Layer Cake
  • Secrets And Lies
  • Heat (1995)
  • Rear Window
  • Requiem For A Dream
  • Old Boy
  • Texas Chainsaw Massacre (1974)
  • Double Indemnity
  • Hudsucker Proxy
  • La Haine

Ahmed‘s List:

  • Bad Boys  
  • The Dark Knight
  • Drive
  • Demolition Man
  • GodFather 2
  • Stargate
  • BackTto The Future
  • Se7en
  • Time Crimes
  • Leon The Professiona

FilmiGirl‘s List:

  • A Hard Day’s Night
  • American Movie
  • Linda LInda Linda
  • Pithamagan
  • A (Kannada film by Upendra)
  • Dil Se
  • Sholay
  •  F for Fake
  • All About Eve
  • Crying Game


Here is the Sight And Sound List, click here for the complete list.


1. Vertigo (Hitchcock, 1958)

2. Citizen Kane (Welles, 1941)

3. Tokyo Story (Ozu, 1953)

4. La Regle du Jeu (Renoir, 1939)

5. Sunrise: a Song for Two Humans (Murnau, 1927)

6. 2001: A Space Odyssey (Kubrick, 1968)

7. The Searchers (Ford, 1956)

8. Man with a Movie Camera (Dziga Vertov, 1929)

9. The Passion of Joan of Arc (Dreyer, 1927)

10. 8½ (Fellini, 1963)

And here is the Alternative Film Bloggers Poll from HeyUGuys, click here for the complete list.


1. Jaws
2. Back to the Future
3. = The Dark Knight
3. = Blade Runner
5. = 2001 A Space Odyssey
5. = There Will Be Blood
5. = Psycho
5. = Citizen Kane
9. Pulp Fiction
10. = The Thing
10. = Alien

I’ve added everyone’s twitter handle if you want to chuck stones at us, of course if you are a more chilled out person, you can always use the comment section below!


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Black cats, unlucky for some

As July draws to a close, so does the small-scale marathon I’ve undertaken at the British Film Institute this month. I’ve already written about a classic Japanese horror, Onibaba but last week I had the fortune to watch Kuroneko, another Japanese film from the same genre.

Very much a companion piece to Onibaba, Kuroneko is also directed by Kaneto Shindo – shot 4 years later and with two of the actors (Kei Sato and Nobuko Otawa).

This brief synopsis shows the similarities of the 2 movies: a woman & daughter in-law live in a hut, on the edge of some woods and, as with Onibaba, we learn that the daughter’s husband is away fighting in the civil war. A group of soldiers appears, helping themselves to food and water before raping and killing the 2 women. We see a black cat licking at the two bodies and the hut is burned to the ground. Some time later, samurai start to die mysteriously.

And that, however, is where the similarities end.  I noted the almost claustrophobic feeling of Onibaba and Kuroneko spares us this.  It is a more open film, not with its head down in the reeds and rushes and is able to at least let us feel like we can breathe.  Whilst not particularly pleasant, one of the stand-out scenes for me is the opening sequence.  We see a group of soldiers emerge from the forest; the sound is silent & we can can hear only the wind in the trees.  Once the men reach the water, they bend down, like animals to a trough.  The sound is enhanced and there is no dialogue, just the noises of the slurping as their thirst is slaked.  Once the men enter the hut, there is also little if no conversation – merely grunting as the men help themselves to the women’s food, before the rape.  The scene ends as the soldiers retreat back to the forest – assimilated back from whence they came – and the hut is left to burn to the ground.

One of the clever tricks that Shindo plays is to tell us that the women have been taken over by the (vengeful) spirit of the demon as a black cat, without showing us fully.  We see glimpses of a long mane of hair, feline features from a distance or a hair covered arm, but never “cat women” as such.  Indeed, there is a scene near the end, that sent a full on chill right the way down my spine and is the culmination of all of these clever little shots.

I really enjoyed Kuroneko, possibly more so than Onibaba even.  It’s never going to rival anything from the modern horror catalogue – Saw, The Ring, Nightmare on Elm Street etc – in terms of blood and gore, but it has the feeling of being crafted, of being a film about human nature, myth and superstition.  It does of course have its moments of absolute terror (and humour) and so to have started my journey into Japanese horror movies with these two fine examples, makes me feel a tad lucky.  Next stop on the journey will have to be Kwaidan, Masaki Kobayashi‘s renowned shocker from 1964.


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Gangsters, Queens and Rappers: 3rd LIFF serves up an explosive cocktail

The 3rd Edition of the London Indian Film Festival (20 June – July 3) is a feast for the senses, featuring circuses, mobsters, cockfights, transvestites and kite-flying, set in some of the world’s greatest cities and some never before seen virgin locations.

With funding from Film London and supported by the BFI and BAFTA, and sponsored by Western Union, the festival brings to UK audiences a selection of cutting edge films from some of the hottest independent talents from India, UK, US and Bangladesh.

The UK Premiere of Anurag Kashyap’s Gangs of Wasseypur, right after its full house screenings at the Cannes Directors’ Fortnight, opens the festival, at Cineworld, Haymarket on 20 June. British director Danny Boyle has cited Kashyap’s Black Friday as an inspiration for Slumdog Millionaire. The film is produced by Viacom 18.

The festival hosts World Premieres of two British films. Tooting Broadway featuring Elizabeth Henstridge,who has been touted the next Keira Knightley, from her beginnings in the TV series Hollyoaks, to her new status in Hollywood, where she will be seen in the upcoming horror film by the Butcher Brothers’, The Thompsons. Arjun and Alison has a storyline with parallels to the murder of British teenager, Stephen Lawrence and is a film that tackles racism in British society.

The festival will go on to showcase the work of the new wave of independent South Asian and British Asian filmmakers, including a director only named as Q, Rajan Khosa and Srijit Mukherji, whose thrill a minute whodunit Baishey Srabon (Seventh August) will close the festival on July 3, alongside a Q&A with its beautiful actress, Raima Sen.

The festival will stretch city wide, in venues like the Tate Modern, Cineworld O2 and ICA for the very first time and returning venues like the BFI Southbank, Nehru Centre, Watermans and Cineworlds Trocadero, Wood Green and Wandsworth.

Delhi In A Day engages the British writer of All God’s Creatures, Billy Fox, as the storyline consultant. US film A Decent Arrangement stars Adam Laupus (Law & Order) and Shabana Azmi (Kathyrn Bigelow’s Zero Dark Thirty, Mira Nair’s The Reluctant Fundamentalist, Deepa Mehta’s Midnight’s Children).

Festival Director Cary Rajinder Sawhney says:

“As part of the festival we are undertaking several exciting new commissions, mixing film and arts, one of these is Gandu Circus – a live Jungle – rap rock performance by Kolkata based rapper and revolutionary film director, Q. This performance will be performed on stage at BFI Southbank on 21st June after a screening of Q’s film Gandu, a compelling story of a young Bengali teenager addicted to rap and sexual fantasies. Expect some special guests on stage including Asian Dub Foundation’s Steve Chandra Savale, joining Q for this one-off, unforgettable performance!”

Glamour, dancing and fabulous saris; award winning Queens! Destiny of Dance is set in a palace owned by head transvestite Ammu, played by Seema Biswas (of Bandit Queen fame). Pride London will be cross promoting this event. A definite family favourite will be Busan International Film Festival audience award winner Dekh Indian Circus with Q&A by Tannishtha Chatterjee (BIFA nominated for Brick Lane).

London Indian Film Festival is supported by Film London’s Cultural Film Exhibition Fund through the National Lottery on behalf of the BFI. Partners include Arts Council of England, Cineworld Cinemas, Western Union, Incredible India, Grange Hotels, Skillset, The Nehru Centre, BollySpice,, Zee TV, Sanona and Eastern Eye, amongst others.

The Satyajit Ray Foundation’s Short Film Competition has joined the Festival with the winning filmmaker receiving a £1,000 Award on 3 July at Cineworld, Haymarket.

All audiences at the festival will be encouraged to vote for this year’s Western Union Audience Award and the winning feature film will be announced at the close of the festival.

Tickets are currently on sale at the BFI and Watermans and sales will commence at Cineworld and other venues from 1st June.


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Ep 41 Misfits Season 3 premiere and QandA with Cast and Creators at BFI

One of the very best British things around right now, Channel 4‘s Misfits makes a welcome return to E4.  Asim and Martin were fortunate enough to see a preview screening of the first episode from season 3, at the British Film Institute on London’s Southbank.

Not only a preview screening, but an intro from the producer, plus Q&A with creator Howard Overman and cast members AND a sneak peak trailer for episode 2.  Joining Howard Overman on stage were Lauren Socha (Kelly ), Iwan Rheon (Simon), Nathan Stewart-Jarret & Robert Sheehan replacement, Joseph Gilgun (Rudy).  Ahead of the Q&A the audience was told “whatever you ask, just make sure it’s not about what superpower we’d like to have if we could choose one!”  The cast must get this question so often it’s like an IV drip.

Season 3 opens with the gang almost all back together and with new powers.  Nathan, we are told is “in Las Vegas” and we are left to really get to know the replacement, Rudy, played absolutely perfectly, by Joseph Gilgun.  Sadly Robert, Rudy’s character is fantastic and we’re just not going to miss Nathan at all!

Without divulging too much, the show’s a cracker – slightly-comical death and sexual return to our screens – and by the time we’ve been introduced to Rudy’s new character the gang are back doing community service in the safe hands of the same probabtion officer from the previous episodes.

Set your Tivo for 10pm Sundays on E4 and find out who the real Heroes are.

Beware: The Episode contains spoilers as usual.


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