Month: November 2012

Amir Khan And Rani Mukherji Interviews for Talaash

Tomorrow sees the release one of the most awaited movies of the year Talaash, starring Amir Khan, Rani Mukherji, Kareena Kapoor and Nawazuddin Sidiqqui.

We have been covering the movie extensively with promo songs, trailer, an exclusive interview with director Reema Kagti (click here) But we have truly saved the best for last and that is 2 interviews with massive stars squeezed into a single podcast.

Your ear buds might just explode with awesomeness as we chat with Amir Khan and Rani Mukherji about Talaash.

 

We have been massive fans of both these actors for decades and the chance to speak with both of them was quite daunting but it happened and we can now share it with all our lovely listeners.

 

Do share your thoughts with us in the comment section and drop us an email, tweet or a rating on iTunes.

 

Talaash Releases tomorrow and hopefully we will be reviewing it for you too!

Stay Tuned

 

@asimburney

 

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Blu Ray Competition Jet Li’s Flying Swords Of Dragon Gate

Flying Swords of Dragon Gate PosterWe have 3 Blu-Ray’ss to give away from Jet Li’s 3D extravaganza. We reviewed the movie at the time of it’s release (read it here) but since then it has garnered quite a few positive reviews (reaching up to a respectable 70% on Rotten Tomatoes)

So we have 3 copies of the movie to give away in Blu-Ray and if you have a 3D TV and those nifty glasses then you can watch kicks and swords fly towards your face.

 

 

How to win:

1. Like on Facebook (like US) and following us on Twitter (Follow US) !

2. Drop us a mail on upodcasting@gmail.com

3. Answer the question: My favorite Jet Li movie is… and why?

 

 

Best answers will be announced on the show. Our Twitter feed and FB page on 15 december!

And how knows, we might just do an entire show on the best choice.

Here is a synopsis and trailer to the movie!

Legendary martial arts action star Jet Li (Romeo Must Die, The Expendables 1&2) stars in thriller film FLYING SWORDS OF DRAGONS GATE, the first ever Chinese-lingo and wuxia film to be shot in 3D and shown in the stereoscopic IMAX format.

Released by the award winning independent film company Revolver Entertainment, this epic story, set in the Ming Dynasty, is a rollercoaster ride of 3-D Kung-Fu action sequences, breathtaking scenery and visual mastery. Brought to you by the special effects team that created Avatar, it is no surprise this film has become the fourth highest grossing Chinese language film of all time.

Written and directed by the cutting-edge and internationally acclaimed visionary director, Hark Tsui – who recently became the fourth Chinese film director to join the board of judges for the 57th Cannes Film Festival and famed for his incredible work on Shanghai Blues, Seven Swords and Once Upon a Time in China – this film is a reimagining of an original classic, rather than a re-make.

FLYING SWORDS OF DRAGONS GATE is the first Wuxia Chinese language film to be shot entirely in 3D, a feat that has earned it seven nominations at the Asian Film Awards 2012 since its release in Hong Kong at the end of 2011. The film boasts special effects and action sequences that are set to redefine the standards of the industry.

Set amongst such great Hollywood 3D epics as Avatar, Transformers and Titanic 3D, Flying Swords of Dragon Gate will provide action movie buffs with a visual feast of film-making set to get the adrenaline pumping and the heart racing.

Starring some of Chinese cinema and Hollywood’s leading action and martial arts stars, including, Zhou Xun, Chen Kun, Li Yuchun, Kwai Lun-mei, Louis Fan and Mavis Fan, the film tells the tale of a pregnant palace maid on the verge of execution. Rescued by the owner of Dragon’s Gate Inn, the concubine is lead into a parallel story involving a band of people in search of lost treasure. Seeking refuge from an oncoming storm at Dragon Gate Inn, the plot climaxes to see the two stories converge to create an action-packed quest for treasure amidst a tale of star-crossed love, all enveloped by a time frame that marks the arrival of a catastrophic storm that threatens to destroy everything.

@asimburney

 

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Jab Tak Hai Jaan Review Upodcast

Jab Tak Hai Jaan ImageThis week we dissect Shah Rukh Khan’s latest movie Jab Tak Hai Jaan where he starts along side Katrina Kaif and Anushka Sharma (After Rab Ne Banadi Jodi).

 

 

 

 

Unfortunately this became legendary film director Yash Chopra’s final movie.

  • So does Jab Tak Hai Jaan still weave that classic Yash Chopra magic?
  • Does his cocktail of pathos laden, eternal love still work in todays Instant Noodle Age?
  • Can ShahRukh still romance a tree?
  • And can Katrina Kaif carry the mantle of legendary YRF heroines before her?

To talk about JTHJ some amazingly talented and well-spoken guest joins us, Daniel Pillai from Omni’s Bollywood Boulevard and WSJ India Real Time, Priya Joshi from Digital Spy who make their debut on Upodcast.

Joining for the 2nd time is Sujoy Singha, who has his own hilarious Hindi Movie Podcast called the Tripple Eggs Podcast and of course his gifs on Bollypop and Geekiness on OneKnightStand.

Let us know what you think of the show in the comment section below or drop us an email to Upodcasting@gmail.com

You can download/listen/ share below:

 

@asimburney

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Midnights Children an Alternative Review

Midnights Children PosterWe were lucky enough to catch Deepa Mehta’s adaptation of Salman Rushdie’s novel Midnights Children at the London Film Festival, and Martin Cawley loved it. Here is his review if you didn’t get a chance to read it.

But now with the release being closer, we had the chance to send our intrepid guest blogger and all round funny guy Sujoy Singha to have another look at he had quite a different take on the movie.

Here is Sujoy’s review who is also know as @9e3k on twitter and his wonderful Gif’s have been featured all over the interwebz:

Deepa Mehta’s latest feature, Midnight’s Children, is based upon the Man Booker prize winner book of the same name by Salman Rushdie. Rushdie has written the screenplay, and is also the narrator to this tale of three generations, and three different nations that stem out of a single one. The devil is in the details, as they say, and you get to experience exactly that in an excruciating snail pace, as Mehta indulges in the many details strewn across Rushdie’s faithful adaptation. It is hence, very difficult to review Midnight’s Children without diving into the details, and by that, I mean, discuss specific plot points which make it almost unwatchable to a certain extent. And so this review will have some minor spoilers.

Midnight’s is the story of Saleem Sinai (Darsheel Safary, Satya Bhabha), born at the very moment when India declared its independence, and by some stroke of luck, has a special power to connect with other children across India, who were born that very night – all of them having some superhuman power, although nothing of these powers is hardly anything to talk about, and it doesn’t become the focal point of the plot either. It is Sinai who gives a first person view of the state of the nations and many other historical milestone events, much like Forrest Gump. But the story doesn’t start there. It starts with the love story of Saleem’s grandfather, Aadam Aziz (Rajat Kapoor with a ridiculous prosthetic make up that means fuck all to me). And when told from Saleem’s perspective, it just doesn’t make sense, especially when Saleem starts narrating his grandfather’s sex life. Now that is some futuristic sperm. And boy oh boy, there are quite a few of these sex scenes at uniform intervals. Is that a filmmaker’s motif, or just a lame excuse to fit into that arty film mould? Fuck knows.

Spanning across almost 80 years, Rushdie’s tale has characters frequently entering the screen and exiting sooner than you realise. Mehta has been able to cast some really good actors no doubt, but they all fail to leave any lasting impression. Rahul Bose playing Army Chief Zulfikar is almost laughable, as he delivers monologue after monologue like a straight-up English play. Picture this; Zulfikar, on seeing Emerald (Saleem’s aunt) for the first time, falls in love with her. When he walks out of Aadam Aziz’s house, he says to his comrades in a very army general  tone – “Soldier, that is the woman I intend to marry. And the soldier replies – YES SIR!  Now that might seem like a good line in a book, but seeing that onscreen almost made me spill my drink.

There’s Ronit Roy, Shreeya Saran, Shahana Goswami, Siddharth, Khulbhushan Kharbanda, Soha Ali Khan, and even Shabana Azmi. And all of them seem too grateful to be in a Deepa Mehta/Salman Rushdie production to complain the mediocrity of their roles. I really wanted Siddharth to show off some badassness that his character promised, but alas that never happened.  And oh, there’s even Ranvir Shorey and Vinay Pathak, cast as Laurel and Hardy – no kidding. The biggest casting mishap however is of Suresh Menon as a Pakistani Field Marshall. I mean that pretty much ruined it for me. He is the equivalent of a modern day Jagdeep (but better). Now you wouldn’t cast Jagdeep as a Field Marshall, unless you were attempting a farce. And this is neither a farce, nor it seemed like a serious allegory that it was so desperately attempting to be one.

The only saving grace is Seema Biswas who can act her face off, even when she’s given so less material to play with. Her story seemed rushed, but even then, I was more interested to know how things were with her, than to know stupid Saleem’s ramblings. Yes, all these events are shown in the most clean and yet cinematically sumptuous fashion that Mehta is most known for. But even then, the drag of the script left me tired, underwhelmed, and with an overall bland aftertaste. It is only the striking background score by Nitin Sawhney which ties the narrative well, and for fans, there is even a Jagjit Singh track which caught me by surprise.

But despite that, the film fails to impress me. It goes from historical milestone 1 to 2 and so on. But by the end of it all, nothing came out of it. It lacked the emotional or dramatic connect that an epic tale of this size requires. Rushdie’s screenplay is the culprit here; it almost makes Mehta seem like an inept filmmaker. At a staggering two and a half hours, this will test your patience. Life’s too short and you’re better off watching MTV Jackass. At least that does exactly what it says on the tin.

Rating: 1 big plot-hole out of 5

 

Find more of Sujoy’s work on : OneKnightStands | Bollypop | @9E3K

 

@asimburney

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Reema Kagti Director of Talaash Interview Upodcast

From AD, to script writer to director of HoneyMoon Travels ltd., Reema Kagti has been slowly working together with her partners at excel movies towards giving us this year’s Amir Khan release, Talaash.

Tagged as a Suspense drama and starring Rani Mukherjee, Kareena Kapoor and Nawazuddin Sidiqqui, we had the chance to speak with the passionate film director about how she became a film maker, her cinematic influences growing up, her journey with Excel movies and if Amir Khan really does have a halo above his head.

 

So Check out our Upodcast Exclusive interview with Reema Kagti and stay tuned for the chat we had with Amir Khan, which we will be posting in a couple of days too!

 

Talaash Releases in theaters, 30th of November

@asimburney

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Oz The Great and Powerful: New Full Trailer and Movie Stills

We posted quite a few posters a couple of days ago and now we get the full trailer and a few still from the movie, set to be Disney first big release of 2013.

I love most of the cast involved just as long as the titular character doesn’t “Franco” it up. Whatever we’ve seen looks beautfil and colorful and I just hope that it stays clearly away from the Burton-esque esthetic of recent Disney releases.

Let us know what you think!

Oz The Great and Powerful Releases 13th of December

@asimburney

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Race 2 Trailer Breakdown

Director Duo Abbas Mustan have been on a mission to prove that Hindi movies can be as slick, fast paced but also inane and uninspired as any the studio action movie from Hollywood.

 

It’s a template they’ve had quite a bit of success especially with the first Race which was a topsy turvy twistarama of a movie where everyone was looking uber hot except Akshay Khanna’s hairpiece. After the epic failure of Players (where Bobby Deol played a magician and Sonam Kapoor a computer hacker…nuff said?) they are back with fast cars, race horses, guitar riffs and Saif Ali Khan’s beard.

 

Here’s the trailer:

Some thoughts:

  • Who asked for this sequel to be made? (Except the producers)
  • The trailer is contending to set at least 2 world records: “the most mentions of the title to a movie in any trailer” (8 mentions in a trailer of 2.30 min) and ” most number of low angle shots” (every character)
  • Peedika’s Stylist has gone for the “neandhertaler chique” for her eyebrows
  • Will Jacqueline Fernandez’ voice dubbed by the same generic voice artist in every movie? Just learn the language already, no one minds and accent!
  • The trailer contains the absolute best lines the script writers could come up with, thinking if this doesn’t get butts in seats, then nothing will! (What does the line “Ghora bi hero banega”mean???)
  • John Abraham can’t throw a convincing punch to save his life
  • Also why did his pecks not get a separate credit as the main attraction?
  • Ameesha Patel…hahahhahahahhahahhaa
  • Anil Kapoor is bad ass as always, after all these years Lakhan still rules anything he is in!
  • How bad does the CGI and wire work look? That jump Saif does is thoroughly underwhelming and didn’t they blow up exactly the same cars in the previous Race?
  • And just to finish Ameesha Patel… HAHAHAHHAHA

 

Race 2 releases in theaters in january, there is no stopping it

 

@asimburney

 

 

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The Hobbit: Amazing New Stills

There really isn’t much to say about The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey, if you loved the previous LOTR trilogy by Peter Jackson and have seen the trailers, you are pretty much completely on board and probably have the date of 13 december marked in your calendar.

Although the original book itself is much shorter, Peter Jackson and Guillermo Del Toro have put their geek brains together and padded the story out for 3 movies.

Some cynics might see it as a cash grab but you can’t deny the passion and love that Jackson has for this world.

 

Here are some exclusive new images from the movie.

 

Honestly, I can’t wait to visit this world again.

@asimburney

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Oz The Great and Powerful New Posters

Although I wasn’t blown away from the first teaser of Oz The Great and Powerful, rewatching the trailer and seeing some of the image and artwork has gotten me more and more excited as time goes by. Maybe it’s the fact that Disney choose to have the movie helmed by Sam Raimi and not their go-to guy Tim Burton, who to me has become quite the boring filmmaker, accompanied by a great cast and quite a bit of imagination setting this inspired prequel takes us back to the land of OZ.

 

Here are some new posters and the teaser trailer. Just love the design and artwork!

 

Monkey/Finley Poster: Oz The Great and Powerful

Oz the Great and Powerful - Poster 1

 

 

Synopsis:

Disney’s fantastical adventure “Oz The Great and Powerful,” directed by Sam Raimi, imagines the origins of L. Frank Baum’s beloved character, the Wizard of Oz. When Oscar Diggs (James Franco), a small-time circus magician with dubious ethics, is hurled away from dusty Kansas to the vibrant Land of Oz, he thinks he’s hit the jackpot—fame and fortune are his for the taking—that is until he meets three witches, Theodora (Mila Kunis), Evanora (Rachel Weisz) and Glinda (Michelle Williams), who are not convinced he is the great wizard everyone’s been expecting. Reluctantly drawn into the epic problems facing the Land of Oz and its inhabitants, Oscar must find out who is good and who is evil before it is too late. Putting his magical arts to use through illusion, ingenuity—and even a bit of wizardry—Oscar transforms himself not only into the great and powerful Wizard of Oz but into a better man as well.

When small-time magician Oscar Diggs (James Franco) pulls one flimflam too many, he finds himself hurled into the fantastical Land of Oz where he must somehow transform himself into the great and powerful Wizard—and just maybe into a better man as well.

UK Release Date: March, 2013

@asimburney

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Life Of Pi: Exclusive Video Diary Suraj Sharma

Every shot we have seen from Life of Pi has just been excruciatingly beautiful, and although we haven’t read Yann Martel’s book the movie is based on yet, it has been recommended to us at least a gajillion time (no joke). Shot in eye popping 3D, Ang Lee is certainly an interesting cinematic voice even more so as he loves genre hopping.

And even though it’s only a cameo, I would love to see Tabu on screen again after such a big gap.

Here is video diary of Suraj Sharma who plays the titular role of Pi in the movie, nice kid!

and here is an excerpt from the press release:

Follow young Suraj Sharma, the debut star of the breath-taking film Life of Pi, in an up-close, behind the scenes exclusive on his experiences and challenges behind the spotlight.

New to the scene of acting, Suraj bagged himself the lead role in the highly anticipated film. He says: “I never knew I would be here on this scale.” See how he handles his first premier and red carpet stating “It’s like a walk in the Park” in this special video diary.

Academy Award-winning director Ang Lee (“Brokeback Mountain,” “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon”) directs LIFE OF PI, based upon Yann Martel’s beloved book, which went on to become one of the biggest publishing events of the past decade. An epic adventure of magical realism, LIFE OF PI follows the story of a young man’s incredible survival at sea against almost impossible odds. A remarkable breakthrough in the use of 3D technology, PI will take audiences on an emotionally captivating journey that will inspire, touch and transport them to a place of discovery they will be unable to forget. LIFE OF PI releases on 20th December 2012 from Twentieth Century Fox in 3D and 2D.

@asimburney

 

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Psycho versus Psycho

Psycho to the power of erm, Psycho

…or Psycho x 5 as was last week’s reality, at the Leicester Square theatre; screened with www.cigaretteburnscinema.com.  Let me start with a brief description of the concept: 1 main screen showing Alfred Hitchcock’s original and 5 smaller screens showing the Gus Van Sant 1998 remake.  Of course, this only makes sense as the remake is so slavishly close to the 1960 version.  However, it did require months of work (editing) and given Psycho 1998 is ten minutes shorter, the occasional blank screen whilst the colour version “caught-up” with the black and white.  I’m not going to start talking about the many and various merits of Psycho – it’s been critiqued to death and there’s a good (probably) film with Anthony Hopkins in, about to be released that can give you a bunch of that knowledge.  What I will do is talk about some interesting scenes, reveal a lot of the plot and give some thoughts on the remake.  The last point is possibly unfair, given the sound was from the original, but it is what it is.

Firstly, I didn’t find it that hard to concentrate on both – I picked my secondary screen and stuck to it.  Usefully, I happened to see Psycho (1960) in the cinema a few weeks ago, so I could give more attention to the remake.  One of the consistent differences between the two is the shots that are mirrored; Perkins facing left, Vince Vaughan facing right for example.  Most notably of course, the remake is in colour.  I liked the quite vivid colouring and felt that it added a great sense of seediness and sleaziness to the whole thing, most notably the shots of the motel, with the neon.

More specifically, I managed to note a few key scenes had changed quite a lot.  Certainly the build-up to the shower scene is more graphic, with Norman Bates being seen to masturbate whilst he looks at Anne Heche‘s Marion Crane in the shower; something that is only alluded to in the Hitchcock.  Shortly thereafter, we all know what happens to the female lead, although with Gus Van Sant, we get to see the knife marks on Marion’s back and more noticeably, where Hitchcock slowly zooms out from Marion’s eye, in the remake the camera rotates around the eye, echoing the blood-stained water draining down the plug hole.

In the end, having watched the two of these movies side by side, I really loved it.  It does however beg the question of why movies could, should, would be remade and if so, what ought to be brought to them?  And in picking Psycho – such a revered movie – was it a wise choice given only minor tinkering and the slavish, almost fetishised replication?  Personally, I don’t mind that it’s been reworked or even the reworked version, but I do feel that setting it in perhaps the 70s or 80s would have been more effective.  Until someone else chooses another iconic movie and takes almost a frame by frame remake, this is going to stand alone: a one-off piece of controversy and for many, derision.

@martincawley

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